Tips for National Beer Day: Avoid Cavities and Maintain Oral Health

Beer is one of the world’s oldest and most loved beverages. On April 7, 1933, beer was made legal in the United States, a huge move by the American government to end the prohibition of alcoholic beverages. The date is now celebrated as “National Beer Day,” and it’s the perfect time to get together with friends and enjoy some of your favorite brews. However, before you plan your night on the town, you should consider the affects that drinking beer might have on your teeth. This is even more important if you drink beer regularly.

Beer and Cavities: Is Your Favorite Brew a Concern?

The idea that beer might hurt your teeth is probably news to you. Many people have a misconception that beer doesn’t contain sugar because it doesn’t taste sweet. Unfortunately, the opposite is true. While beer contains no added sugar, it does contain 13 grams of carbohydrates in a serving. When carbohydrates mix with the natural bacteria found in your mouth, plaque begins to form. This plaque is what eventually leads to gum disease and tooth decay.

Enamel Damage: is Acidic Beer Damaging to Your Teeth?

Beer and other acidic beverages, such as lemonade, can damage to the structure of your teeth. Acids eat away at your tooth enamel, and once it’s gone, it doesn’t usually come back. Worn-down enamel leads to extreme sensitivity, tooth discoloration and other serious problems. It’s not an issue that you want to take lightly.

Tips for National Beer Day: Avoid Cavities and Maintain Oral Health

1. Stay Light

Have you ever heard people complain that certain beers are “like water”? They might be less pleasing to connoisseurs, but beers that are lighter in color and thinner in consistency are typically less acidic. A sour taste generally indicates acidity, so when sampling drinks on National Beer Day, avoid a second drink of anything that tastes sour. Malt beers in darker colors are also very hard on your teeth.

2. Hydrate

Beer is liquid, but it’s much less hydrating than water. If you want to protect your teeth, avoid getting too drunk and reduce the odds of having a hangover the next day, drink plenty of water in between beers. It’s also a good idea to swish the water around your mouth to clean your teeth.

3. Chew Sugarless Gum

Pop a stick of sugarless gum in your mouth and chew while walking from one bar to another. This activates your saliva glands and helps to cleanse the excess bacteria from your teeth and gums.

The best way to avoid cavities and maintain great oral health is by visiting the dentist regularly. Along with removing plaque and tartar from your teeth, the dentist can also keep an eye on your teeth and let you know of any early signs of tooth decay.

For more information about oral health and how it can affect your dental insurance, please contact us today.

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